Calculated Column Limits (1024 Characters)


So hopefully many people out there know there is an 8 level nesting limit on Calculated columns (see Microsoft’s article here: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepointtechnology/HA101215881033.aspx. The way to get around this is to probably use choose statements, or to use multiple calculated columns.

I also think I discovered a 1024 character limit today (it’s a huge pain in my butt), but I could only find one comment response that agrees with that being a limit. I honestly can’t guess as to why it’s limited to 1024 characters (query string/url limitation?) but it is a definite limit from what I can see. You can create multiple calculated columns still (in my case I had a 7000 character extremely complex formula, so I probably won’t do this and will just use excel and push it up with excel services) to get around the limit. 🙂

Just wanted to share this with anyone wondering why they keep getting the “The formula contains a syntax error or is not supported.” when they have a large number of characters (over 1024) in their calculation formula.
Richard Harbridge

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5 Comments on “Calculated Column Limits (1024 Characters)”


  1. Thank you for sharing this with us, I was having a cow thinking that my formula was not working! I will see if I can condense my strings.

  2. Dominic Says:

    Thanks for sharing, I thought I was losing my mind.

  3. Gary Says:

    thanks for sharing, I hit both these issues today and spent hours trying to troubleshoot.


  4. […] This result was very successful. In fact later research I found a single post “Calculated Column Limits (1024 Characters)”. […]

  5. linmic45 Says:

    For formulas in 7k size, I’ll divided the formula into 12 or 15 parts and save them in individual calculated columnes; then I’ll create another calculated column to concatenate all parts of formula back into one. hope this helps.


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